October 2010  
Family Economic Success Newsletter
In this Issue

NEWS

Center for Working Families Event Draws 300 from 30 Cities

Federal Grants Go to 3 Projects That Support CFES Work

Mistakes to Success Book Published, CFES’ Giloth is Co-Editor

Foreclosure Campaign Focuses on Communities of Color


PUBLICATIONS, PRESENTATIONS AND OTHER RESOURCES

Casey and CFED Document "Upside Down" Asset-Building Subsidies

Brief Assesses Funders Support for Postsecondary Programs

Interviews Highlight Lessons from Pre-Apprenticeship Programs

Older Americans Keep Working Long After Age 65

New Jersey Workers Face Barriers to College Financial Aid

The Annie E. Casey Foundation's quarterly Center for Family Economic Success (CFES) Newsletter provides updates on our work promoting family economic success in the context of building supportive communities for children and families. The aspiration of the new center is to link people, place and opportunity. CFES embraces the traditional FES goals of enabling parents to advance in the workforce and build the assets needed to secure better futures for their families. It also encompasses investments in creating affordable, mixed-income communities with access to a rich array of services, opportunities and supports.

NEWS
Center for Working Families Event Draws 300 from 30 Cities
A Chicago convening on integrated approaches to building family economic success brought together 300 funders, intermediary groups and federal officials in July. Focusing on the Center for Working Families model developed by the Casey Foundation, participants discussed important investments in transitional jobs, health-care jobs for low-skilled workers, financial education and other innovations that work for low-income families. The U.S. departments of Labor, Treasury and Health and Human Services were represented there.

Federal Grants Go to Three Projects That Support CFES Work
Leveraging Casey's investments, three collaborative projects that support the Foundation's family economic success approach received federal funding in the first round of the Social Innovation Fund (SIF) grants. The regional workforce development efforts by the National Fund for Workforce Solutions, the integrated services approach used by Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) and the array of anti-poverty programs in the Mayor's Fund to Advance New York City were among 11 organizations to receive grants.

Mistakes to Success Book Published, CFES’ Giloth is Co-Editor
A collection of essays detailing common mistakes and solutions in nonprofit and philanthropic work was published this month with contributions from several Casey staff members. Vice President Robert Giloth, who leads CFES, edited the book, Mistakes to Success: Learning and Adapting When Things Go Wrong, along with Colin Austin of MDC, Inc. Giloth also wrote chapters on "Replicating Model Programs" and "The Perils of Site Selection." Susan Gewirtz, who heads the Center for Working Families program, contributed a chapter on "The Dangers of Outcome Measures in Workforce Development."

See more about the book here

Foreclosure Campaign Focuses on Communities of Color
The Foundation is helping to define a campaign to draw attention to the disparate effect of foreclosure on low-income communities of color. At a June meeting hosted by Casey, nearly 60 experts representing 30 organizations agreed with the urgent need to focus on addressing wealth loss, stabilizing communities and developing policy and program solutions. A subsequent survey identified four key elements that explore communications, research, solutions and advocacy. Work groups on each of the four elements are planning next steps. If you are interested in joining a work group, please contact Jillien Meier (jmeier@aecf.org).

Publications, Presentations and Other Resources
Casey and CFED Document “Upside Down” Asset-Building Subsidies
The United States spent nearly $400 billion last year to help people save money and build wealth, but the vast majority of that money went to the nation's wealthiest taxpayers, according to an analysis of tax and budget programs just released by Casey and the Corporation for Enterprise Development. This inequity is all but invisible because the wealth–building strategies are tucked into the federal tax code—as deductions, credits and preferential rates—rather than in the annual budget, according to "Upside Down: America's $400 Billion Federal Asset-Building Budget."

Read the report here

Brief Assesses Funders Support for Postsecondary Programs
Strengthening state postsecondary education and skill development programs requires comprehensive changes to public policies and institutional practices. A new Working Poor Families Project policy brief summarizes seven national reform initiatives supported by foundations and geared toward improving postsecondary education programs. The brief also gives recommendations for state organizations to support these reform efforts. The Working Poor Families Project is supported by Casey and other foundations.

Read the brief here

Interviews Highlight Lessons from Pre-Apprenticeship Programs
Pre-apprenticeship programs play a significant role in developing a skilled and diverse construction workforce and are receiving increased support from stimulus dollars, but leaders still find resources and job opportunities scarce in the economic downturn, according to a new paper by The Aspen Institute's Workforce Strategies. For the paper supported by the Casey Foundation, Aspen interviewed 25 leaders of promising and innovative pre-apprenticeship programs across the country. They concluded the programs' role could be expanded through additional funding to local initiatives, research into career pathways and investments in aging public infrastructure and energy efficiency.

Read the report here

Older Americans Keep Working Long After Age 65
With increased emphasis on reforming Social Security, a brief from the Carsey Insititute shows that a greater percentage of older Americans are staying in the workforce longer. Nearly a quarter of women and a third of men between ages 65 and 69 are still in the work force, many of them working full time. With support from the Casey Foundation and others, Carsey conducts policy research on vulnerable children, youth and families.

Read the brief here

New Jersey Workers Face Barriers to College Financial Aid
Low-income adult workers trying to pursue post-secondary education in New Jersey encounter significant barriers to accessing financial aid, according to a report supported by the Working Poor Families Project. Although New Jersey ranks among the top three states in the amount of grant and scholarship assistance offered per student, working adults encounter a complex application process, inconsistent criteria and increasingly high tuition and costs, according to "Paying for College: Availability of Need-based Financial Aid for Low-Income Working Adult Students in New Jersey."

Read the brief here


Please let us know if this newsletter is helpful to you and how it might be improved to meet your needs. Contact fesnewsletter@aecf.org with questions or suggestions. Feel free to forward this newsletter to interested colleagues.
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