Practice Guide

This “getting started” guidebook provides concrete approaches for developing neighborhood-focused strategies for improving blighted conditions in inner cities. Geared toward city officials, it presents how-to chapters on correct data gathering, planning stakeholder partnerships, accessing available resources, incorporating agency best practices and implementing community tips. 

March 30, 2000

In This Report, You’ll Learn

  1. 1

    Why local neighborhood transformation should be important to city officials.

  2. 2

    Who should be at the planning table for real neighborhood change to occur.

  3. 3

    What data informs government policy and practice at the local level.

  4. 4

    The important distinction between constituent services and neighborhood improvement.

Key Takeaway

Cities need to establish boundaries with the neighborhoods

The reality is that there are not enough resources to fix every problem or address every worthy cause in urban neighborhoods. Among the most important early tasks for city government in setting up neighborhood offices is clarity about the scope of work to be addressed and the role the city will play.  What can you fix and what has to be sidelined must be on the table. 

Findings & Stats

Statements & Quotations