Report

According to decades of research, the best way to ensure a successful workforce in the future is to invest in early childhood development now. And the best way to provide early learning for needy kids is by coordinating family, school and community efforts. But analysis shows that by age 8, most children in the United States are not on track in cognitive knowledge and skills because efforts are not coordinated or linked to outcomes. This KIDS COUNT policy report makes the case for an integrated and comprehensive solution to meet the developmental needs of all children through age 8. 

December 2, 2013

KIDS COUNT Policy Reports

In This Report, You’ll Learn

  1. 1

    Why low-income kids are already failing by the time they are 8 years old and what we can do about it.

  2. 2

    The 3 priority goals for meeting the brain growth needs of all little kids.

  3. 3

    How coordination of education, healthcare and economic opportunity increases kids’ success factors.

  4. 4

    The KIDS COUNT policy recommendations that will create durable success for kids, families and communities.

Key Takeaway

The findings in this policy report suggest that high-quality early childhood programs that include support for families have a powerful and lasting impact on children as they progress through school and into adulthood.

Since 2010, federal spending on children has declined and is projected to continue decreasing over the next decade to its lowest point since the Great Depression.

Findings & Stats

Statements & Quotations