Report

Jeremiah Program Boston set out to try something new. It removed the flagship program’s residential core and partnered with Endicott College to offer single mothers and their families a new center of support. This report, which shares findings from a 3.5-year implementation study, tells readers who the partners are, how they worked together and what happened when they forged a new approach that broke the Jeremiah mold.

January 26, 2019

In this Report on Two-Generation Approaches, You'll Learn

  1. 1

    How Jeremiah Program’s residential and non-residential models differ.

  2. 2

    rofiles of four Jeremiah Program Boston participants.

  3. 3

    Key takeaways — so far — from the Jeremiah Program Boston model.

  4. 4

    Where this model falls short in providing an integrated two-generation approach.

Key Finding

Two models, one goal: help single mothers succeed in college and change their family’s life trajectory

The traditional Jeremiah Program aims to stabilize a participant’s entire family by controlling many aspects of their daily lives — including where they live, who they live with and who cares for their children. Its Boston program, on the other hand, doesn’t provide housing or child care and requires travel to all support services. The question is: can the Jeremiah Program move to a new location, lighten its grip and still help families succeed?

Findings & Stats

Statements & Quotations