Mortality Rates for Children Improved Across the Board

Posted December 9, 2014, By the Annie E. Casey Foundation

In the past three decades, the United States has made across-the-board progress in improving the rates of mortality among children (from birth to age 19). For example, the child and teen mortality rate has improved by 43%, dropping from 46 deaths per 100,000 children and teens in 1990 to 26 per 100,000 (representing 10,800 fewer deaths) in 2011. All racial and ethnic groups, as well as kids of all ages, have seen declining mortality rates due to medical advances and increased safety measures, such as more widespread use of seat belts, care seats and bike helmets.

Find new health data for the nation, states and 50 largest U.S. cities in the KIDS COUNT Data Center:

Infant Mortality
Infant Mortality by Race
Child Deaths
Child Deaths by Race 
Teen Deaths From All Causes 
Teen Deaths From All Causes by Race
Teen Deaths by Accident, Homicide and Suicide
Child and Teen Death Rate
Child and Teen Death Rate by Race

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