Report

Today, the number of children (under age 18) in the United States is at an all-time high of 74.2 million. But, the share of the national population who are children is at an all time low of 24%. Based on data from the 2010 census, we find that while there is a small increase in the number of children, the rate at which that population is growing has slowed dramatically over the past 20 years. 

January 1, 2011

In This Report, You’ll Learn

  1. 1

    A review of national-level changes in the number of children, comparing results from the 2010 census with changes over the past century.

  2. 2

    An examination of changes in the racial composition of the child population.

  3. 3

    An examination of state-level changes in the size and racial composition of the child population.

  4. 4

    Highlights of changes in large cities from 2000 to 2010.

  1. 5

    A discussion of the implications of these demographic changes.

Key Takeaway

Changes in the U.S. child population

There was a relatively small increase in the number of children during the 2000 to 2010 period, as the under-18 population grew by 1.9 million. The increase was much lower than the increase during the 1990s when the child population grew by 8.7 million. 

Findings & Stats

Statements & Quotations