Juvenile Justice Network Seeks Advocates of Color for Youth Justice Leadership Institute

Posted April 7, 2019, By the Annie E. Casey Foundation

Leaders in helping reform the youth justice system

Know an advo­cate or orga­niz­er of col­or who wants to trans­form the juve­nile jus­tice field?

Each year, the Nation­al Juve­nile Jus­tice Net­work (NJJN) selects 10 diverse pro­fes­sion­als from across the coun­try to par­tic­i­pate in the Youth Jus­tice Lead­er­ship Insti­tute, a year­long lead­er­ship devel­op­ment cur­ricu­lum focused on youth jus­tice reform.

NJJN — a Casey grantee — is accept­ing appli­ca­tions for its next class through April 292019.

The Insti­tute increas­es the capac­i­ty and effec­tive­ness of advo­cates and orga­niz­ers of col­or to make sys­tem change across the coun­try. Par­tic­i­pants will gain a deep­er knowl­edge of juve­nile jus­tice sys­tems, learn about effec­tive advo­ca­cy and orga­niz­ing tech­niques and work with men­tor advo­cates who are advanc­ing mean­ing­ful sys­tem reforms. They will also form peer learn­ing and sup­port groups and com­plete an advo­ca­cy project to apply their skills in prac­ti­cal ways on behalf of youth in trou­ble with the law.

Appli­cants should be adults of col­or work­ing in the juve­nile jus­tice field or with­in grass­roots com­mu­ni­ty orga­ni­za­tions. They might also have juve­nile jus­tice sys­tem expe­ri­ence — gained first­hand or via a fam­i­ly member.

Lead­ers of col­or con­nect­ed to, proud of and hope­ful for their com­mu­ni­ties are inte­gral to the fun­da­men­tal changes need­ed for true jus­tice,” says Sarah Bry­er, NJJN’s exec­u­tive direc­tor. We devel­oped the Youth Jus­tice Lead­er­ship Insti­tute to ele­vate, sup­port and fol­low the lead­er­ship of those most direct­ly affect­ed, in order to achieve a tru­ly just system.”

Past par­tic­i­pants have engaged in advo­ca­cy projects, such as improv­ing law enforce­ment response to domes­tic vio­lence in Phoenix and increas­ing effec­tive engage­ment with East African youth and fam­i­lies in two Min­neso­ta counties.

Vis­it NJJN’s web­site to learn more

Popular Posts

View all blog posts   |   Browse Topics